blog | facebook | twitter
C'MON C'MON THE CLUB IS OPEN
It is currently Tue Oct 21, 2014 12:56 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 97 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 1:05 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 12:06 pm
Posts: 3528
Location: South
Where does the owner stand with this so far?

Are you in communication with them? Do they want to keep the building?

_________________
Pickles are destroying my life.

confuseddildo.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 2:02 pm 
Mechagodzilla
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2004 2:18 pm
Posts: 1283
Location: Hamilton Beach
front page news.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 2:09 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2003 1:02 pm
Posts: 2897
Location: The After Dark Peach Pit
New jobs might hinge on eminent domain
Monday, December 06, 2004
Debbie Gebolys and Jodi Andes
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH


TOM DODGE | DISPATCH

Image
Corvas Brinkerhoff, 21, a Milo Arts Center resident, paints while, from left, Ben Fox-McCord, Josh Devaney and Dave Lewis relax. Brinkerhoff’s windows overlook the Timken development site.

Image
Rick Mann, owner of the Milo Arts Center and head of the area commission, plans to fight a developer’s plan for the Milo-Grogan area.


Developer Jerome Solove plans to ask the city to wipe out 200 modest homes in Milo-Grogan to make room for a bustling shopping center on an idled industrial site along I-71.

Neighbors are split on the plan, which a city official has called controversial because it involves taking the land by eminent domain.

Solove bought the former Timken Co. manufacturing plant on 31 acres at E. 5 th and Cleveland avenues this fall. Since then, he’s asked the city to declare the neighborhood just east of the site, between Cleveland Avenue and I-71, blighted.

Image

The city then could take the land by eminent domain and name him master developer there.

The idea is controversial, Columbus Development Director Mark Barbash said.

"Nobody wants to do eminent domain," Barbash said. "Columbus is such a conservative community that to start a project with eminent domain is the wrong place to start.

"The first thing you talk about is what’s best for the neighborhood," he said.

Solove would like to make it an urban shopping destination with a "big grocery store, card shop, bakery, mar- ket with fresh fruits and vegetables, hardware, pharmacy, barber/beauty shop, general merchandise, specialty retail, retail banking, pizza, dollar store, hotel, medical/urgent care, laundromat," said a draft proposal given to the city.

But it would displace a community of people who are predominantly elderly or on fixed incomes. It includes 10 to 20 homes built by the Greater Columbus Habitat for Humanity.

Solove said he began meeting with Timken neighbors a year ago. He wants to understand community interests before he announces any specific plans for the site. But he has a general idea of what he wants.

"Retail is the solution," he said. "The opportunity for job creation in that location is very extensive."

For some, Solove is a godsend, offering what they see as the first real hope to bring jobs and services to the area. Milo-Grogan, some say, has been on the decline since the 1960s when I-71 cut it in two.

"It’s crime-ridden. It’s an area that’s been left out, no question about that," said Leroy Johnson, a member of the Milo-Grogan Area Commission who has lived in the area since 1954.

Johnson doesn’t fear demolishing homes since many are abandoned. And, he notes, the plan isn’t final.

Johnson said Solove is proposing services the area has long needed: "The closest post office is at High and 4 th. We had a lot of elderly; we need one closer."

But just the mention of eminent domain angers others.

‘’You’re talking about destroying a historic community. . . . This plan isn’t going to work," said Matt Vaccaro, also an area commissioner and a resident.

Vaccaro is not ready to move. He raised his older son and daughter in a home on St. Clair Avenue for 11 years and wants to raise his younger children there.

The draft talks of "demolition and construction of retail buildings" and "relocating residents from the west side of I-71" to the "east side of 71," but it does not spell out homes being razed, Vaccaro said.

To make sure residents understand the details, Rick Mann is assembling groups to go door to door to explain the fine print.

Mann and his wife spent thousands in legal fees fighting the city when officials tried to evict them in 2000. They own the Milo Arts Center, a former elementary school, where artists work and live.

Now head of the Milo-Grogan Area Commission, Mann and his wife vow to fight again.

But real-estate researcher Ken Danter said Timken is a natural for retail redevelopment.

"With the proximity to the central city, just look at the sheer mass of population. With those attributes, you can’t not look at a site like that," he said.

"To bring that site out to I-71 would be a huge attribute," he added.

What the city can and can’t do could be spelled out next year.

Battles over eminent domain for development are ongoing in Cincinnati and outside Cleveland. In September, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to look at when local governments can take homes and businesses for new projects.

For now, Solove said, he wants to follow Barbash’s advice and wait until city planners develop a Milo-Grogan plan.

Although he hasn’t formally requested city assistance yet, Solove established a redevelopment corporation for the Timken site "to best coordinate public involvement," he said.

Milo-Grogan isn’t scheduled for a community plan, and won’t be unless community members ask for one, Barbash said. Thus far, they haven’t.

The earliest a plan could be completed would be late 2005, Barbash said, and only after that would the city entertain requests from Solove for tax abatements or other incentives.

Still, the city enthusiastically supports redeveloping the site. The Timken factory once employed 5,400 to make railroadcar wheel bearings. It had 220 workers when it closed in 2001.

"The last thing I want to do," Barbash said, "is get down on a redevelopment opportunity."


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 2:47 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 12:06 pm
Posts: 3528
Location: South
Yuck, another inner city strip mall, soon to be trashed with Dollar Stores and Check Cashing Centers..Ick.



http://www.nationaltrust.org/primer/list.asp?i=11

http://www.nationaltrust.org/primer/list.asp?i=8

_________________
Pickles are destroying my life.

confuseddildo.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 3:23 pm 
Mechagodzilla
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2004 2:18 pm
Posts: 1283
Location: Hamilton Beach
A few quick hits on what sticks out of the article, IMO:

1. it states that opinions are split in the neighborhood. This is hardly the case. Part of what Rick Mann has been trying to do over the past couple of days is to get out and tell the people in the neighborhood what is happening. A VAST majority of the people living in the area had no idea what was potentially happening until the last 72 hours.

2. the article also cites the original eminent domain case (for 71) as being the beginning of the decline of the area. Is this a case of: if at first you don't succeed, try, try again? The problems of this area aren't going to disappear with the appearance of a strip mall and a grocery store. They're just going to move somewhere else.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 4:41 pm 
Donewaiting.com Staff
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 12:26 pm
Posts: 7648
Location: Columbus
Quote:
"Retail is the solution"


Holy shit that's funny. Like make me barf funny.

That Timken site is pretty huge, isn't it? would they really need more room than that for a mall?

_________________
This place is like the fair, only it cost a dollar to get in and the rides are junked cars.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 4:54 pm 
Mechagodzilla
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2004 2:18 pm
Posts: 1283
Location: Hamilton Beach
no, they just want it to be right next to the highway, so everyone can get in and out as fast as possible

"To bring that site out to I-71 would be a huge attribute,"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 10:20 pm 
Snarf

Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2004 10:18 pm
Posts: 1
Location: 198 e. lane
What's the latest news on this issue? I've recently joined the Campus Partners Student Advisory Board and I'd gladly bring up any issues anyone has at our next meeting.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2004 10:47 pm 
Mechagodzilla

Joined: Thu Jun 26, 2003 1:13 pm
Posts: 1133
Location: cesspool of filth and tape recorders
williamcompanyman wrote:

Within the last few decades more and more developers are using it as a way to legally steal land - campus partners are a notorious example - and when this behaviour is put to a vote - like the Morse road connector - it is resoundingly defeated.

Good luck


Would have gone right through my back yard. Man, did we fight that one.

"HOMES, NOT HIGHWAYS!"

_________________
rip out an eyeball and place it looking directly into the other one


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 1:52 am 
Mechagodzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2004 11:32 pm
Posts: 1229
the Morse Road Connector will one day be a reality.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 10:38 am 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2003 1:02 pm
Posts: 2897
Location: The After Dark Peach Pit
DEBATE OVER EMINENT DOMAIN
Residents, developers clash throughout state
Tuesday, December 07, 2004
Debbie Gebolys
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

Although Columbus officials say eminent domain is a bad idea for the former Timken Co. site in the Milo-Grogan neighborhood, a growing number of cases nationally are pitting redevelopment riches against embattled homeowners.
Developer Jerome Solove asked Columbus to condemn about 200 homes and businesses between I-71 and Cleveland Avenue near the site to make way for a shopping center. The neighborhood lies between 2 nd and 5 th avenues, and many who live there are elderly or on fixed incomes.
If Solove’s redevelopment plans are deemed for the public good and city officials declare the area blighted, property owners would be forced to sell to the city. Solove could destroy the properties to make way for businesses that would generate more taxes for the city and create up to 1,000 jobs.
Although Columbus Development Director Mark Barbash opposes the idea of forcing homeowners to sell, the city has used eminent domain to force the sale of commercial properties for high-profile projects, including Nationwide Arena and Columbus City Center.
When asked at last night’s City Council meeting about using eminent domain, Mayor Michael B. Coleman said, "It’s a last resort. I think the (Milo-Grogan) site needs to be developed commercially . . . but eminent domain is a whole other story."
Coleman said he’d like to find another way to see the area gain retail stores.
Nationally, experts say eminent domain proposals increasingly include homes, including a Connecticut case that is to be heard early next year by the U.S. Supreme Court. Another simmers in a Cincinnati suburb, while people in a Cleveland suburb needed an election to save their homes.
In fact, Ohio has become a hotbed for eminent domain cases, according to the Institute for Justice, a libertarian law firm based in Washington that takes on governments. Between 1998 and 2002, the institute counted 421 cases where governments condemned or attempted to condemn properties for developers.
"It is clearly a state that is rampant in eminent domain abuse," institute attorney Scott Bullock said. "The good news in Ohio is that people are beginning to fight back."
In the Cincinnati suburb of Norwood, for instance, homeowners want to stop a developer from turning their neighborhood into a shopping-center parking lot. A Hamilton County Common Pleas judge ordered one couple to sell their $280,000 home. Although the home isn’t blighted, the judge said, it is "deteriorating."
Bullock’s firm is representing the couple and their neighbors in an appeal.
In Lakewood, outside Cleveland, city leaders several years ago condemned a middle-class neighborhood, deeming houses there blighted because they lacked two full bathrooms and air conditioning. Voters later removed the blighted status by referendum and defeated the mayor who proposed to fatten city coffers with a condo and shopping development.
Capital University law professor Susan Looper-Friedman said the Ohio cases and others are "a logical extension of the direction the Supreme Court has taken."
Since 1954, she said, the court has been interpreting the Fifth Amendment more broadly. Eminent domain once was used solely for schools, fire stations and other public areas. The Ohio Department of Transportation has used it to take land for construction of the central Ohio interstate system. More recently, courts have allowed governments to take properties for private developers who could enrich the cities and provide jobs.
"They’re pushing that envelope now," Looper-Friedman said, as courts relax the requirement that properties be declared blighted for them to be subject to eminent domain.
"If making money is significant justification, I think we’re all in trouble," she said. "This kind of thing really has the potential of hitting everybody, whether they own a home or rent it."
In Columbus, eminent domain has more commonly been used on commercial properties. When land for City Center was assembled in the 1980s, eminent domain was used to force owners of several office and retail buildings to sell. When Nationwide Arena was built in 2001, Nationwide Realty Investors and The Dispatch Printing Company were able to get several former parking lots and a bar through eminent domain.
Campus Partners used eminent domain to get apartment buildings that stood in the way of the Gateway development now under construction. And in 2000, the city forced the sale of a former bank on N. High St. in Clintonville to expand a fire station there.
Bill Habig, executive director of the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission, said that using eminent domain for private development isn’t necessarily a bad idea.
"I don’t think I’d say it’s dangerous per se," he said. "It depends on the intent of the developer, the financial condition of the city and the consensus of the community."
So-called first suburbs such as Whitehall, Grandview Heights and Bexley face declining tax bases and a near-impossible task of assembling enough land to accommodate meaningful redevelopment projects, Habig said.
If the Supreme Court allows the Connecticut land-taking to proceed, local suburbs might begin eminent domain proceedings of their own.
"Land assembly would be a huge benefit to redevelopment," Habig said


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 1:01 pm 
Donewaiting.com Staff
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 12:26 pm
Posts: 7648
Location: Columbus
how the hell does a strip mall create 1000 jobs? I mean besides the temporary construction and shit. This has got to be about property tax, not job creation.

_________________
This place is like the fair, only it cost a dollar to get in and the rides are junked cars.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:02 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2003 1:10 pm
Posts: 6351
groundrules wrote:
This has got to be about property tax, not job creation.



yep.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:21 pm 
Jet Jaguar
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2003 11:28 pm
Posts: 309
Location: in a bunker somewhere beneath columbus
annie oakley wrote:
Yuck, another inner city strip mall, soon to be trashed with Dollar Stores and Check Cashing Centers..Ick.



http://www.nationaltrust.org/primer/list.asp?i=11

http://www.nationaltrust.org/primer/list.asp?i=8


you're right, but...

This type of use of eminent domain is stealing, coercing, and bullying and it would be wrong wrong wrong even if it was used to build an Aids research center and Atom bomb dissasembler and giant permahappy ray. If what these developers are building is necessary and profitable, let them find willing sellers and pay what the sellers are willing to accept. Otherwise let them design a site that respects private property rights. I am fairly certain none of them live in neighbourhoods in which their houses are threatened by court-mandated sales. I also wonder just what the hell it is about developers that makes them think the only liveable neighbourhood is one with a dozen national chain stores per block and/or no one making under six figures living there.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:24 pm 
Friendship Farmer of the Year 2006
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2003 9:05 am
Posts: 7620
Location: The Cookie Capital of the World
annie oakley wrote:
Yuck, another inner city strip mall, soon to be trashed with Dollar Stores and Check Cashing Centers..Ick.


Isn't that what you do for a living?

_________________
It was fifteen years ago, but I remember it like it was ten.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:33 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 12:06 pm
Posts: 3528
Location: South
Cookie wrote:
annie oakley wrote:
Yuck, another inner city strip mall, soon to be trashed with Dollar Stores and Check Cashing Centers..Ick.


Isn't that what you do for a living?


We do upscale life style centers, like Easton. HIgh income. We also manage them, meaning making sure they look nice, are viable and profitable.

We also kep the integrity of the neighborhood and sites. For instance, Rookwood Pavilion was built on an old industrial site so we used the factory buildings for Don Pablos and some stores.

We are more focused on Urban Renewal.

This one sounds purely build and sell and watch it go down the toilet.
Also, it sounds to me like they are going after eminent domain quite quickly because they don't want to put any money into buying these homes.

_________________
Pickles are destroying my life.

confuseddildo.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:39 pm 
Friendship Farmer of the Year 2006
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2003 9:05 am
Posts: 7620
Location: The Cookie Capital of the World
annie oakley wrote:
We do upscale life style centers, like Easton. HIgh income. We also manage them, meaning making sure they look nice, are viable and profitable.


Malls. You do malls. Such bastions of profitability. You never see any of those going out of business. Oh, wait ...

Just so I'm clear, urban strip malls are bad but "upscale life style centers" (aka suburban malls) are good?

_________________
It was fifteen years ago, but I remember it like it was ten.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:42 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2003 1:02 pm
Posts: 2897
Location: The After Dark Peach Pit
F it, let's tool on the guy's picture:

Ladies & Gentlepersons.... I give you:

Jerome Solove

Image
Ironically found on the Office of the Ohio Consumers' Counsel website, he is the CHAIRMAN of the Residential Utility Advocacy


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:42 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 12:06 pm
Posts: 3528
Location: South
Kelly T@ylor wrote:
In the Cincinnati suburb of Norwood, for instance, homeowners want to stop a developer from turning their neighborhood into a shopping-center parking lot. A Hamilton County Common Pleas judge ordered one couple to sell their $280,000 home. Although the home isn’t blighted, the judge said, it is "deteriorating."
Bullock’s firm is representing the couple and their neighbors in an appeal.
In Lakewood, outside Cleveland.


These are both my company and this is not accurate when it comes to Norwood.

Norwood, where I am sitting right now in my office is not going to be a parking lot. It is a mixed use (residential, office and retail) project that is going to bring lots of money and redevelopment to this neighborhood.


That couple was forced to sell their $95,000.00 home for $280,000.00.

This neighborhood is a cul-de-sac on the interstate and across from The Pavilion and Commons.

We had 90 houses to purchase, five would not sell. So many home owners are waiting for their money, while we had to go trough the legal process.

Now we have eminent domain, the only appealing that can happen is re-valuing. But, now the new fight is when we go into appeal, we still have title to this land, so we are going to break ground and move on with the project. Well, the fight now is whether or not we have the right to do that in the case that by some weird twist of fate, Joe Horney gets his land back. Then it is gone and now it is H&M.

You can take the position that, yes we are big bad developers. But I would rather be focussing on more projects that are city based than sprawling.

_________________
Pickles are destroying my life.

confuseddildo.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:46 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 12:06 pm
Posts: 3528
Location: South
Cookie wrote:
annie oakley wrote:
We do upscale life style centers, like Easton. HIgh income. We also manage them, meaning making sure they look nice, are viable and profitable.


Malls. You do malls. Such bastions of profitability. You never see any of those going out of business. Oh, wait ...

Just so I'm clear, urban strip malls are bad but "upscale life style centers" (aka suburban malls) are good?

Ours are urban and they are not malls. Malls are enclosed. Ours are open air with not only retail, but office and residential uses. We manage them, keep them viable, the proposed center for Milo sounds to me like a developer, who in essence is a slum lord, that is going to get eminent domain, have the state pay for most of this, and then get it built, leased, then sell it,. Then that company will sell it and so on...it will be blight in fifteen years.

_________________
Pickles are destroying my life.

confuseddildo.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:48 pm 
Friendship Farmer of the Year 2006
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2003 9:05 am
Posts: 7620
Location: The Cookie Capital of the World
annie oakley wrote:
You can take the position that, yes we are big bad developers. But I would rather be focussing on more projects that are city based than sprawling.


Whatever helps you sleep at night. You force people out of their homes to make a buck.

_________________
It was fifteen years ago, but I remember it like it was ten.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 2:50 pm 
Friendship Farmer of the Year 2006
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2003 9:05 am
Posts: 7620
Location: The Cookie Capital of the World
annie oakley wrote:
Ours are urban and they are not malls. Malls are enclosed. Ours are open air with not only retail, but office and residential uses.


Um, so you do urban strip malls?

_________________
It was fifteen years ago, but I remember it like it was ten.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 3:02 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 12:06 pm
Posts: 3528
Location: South
Cookie wrote:
annie oakley wrote:
You can take the position that, yes we are big bad developers. But I would rather be focussing on more projects that are city based than sprawling.


Whatever helps you sleep at night. You force people out of their homes to make a buck.



85 people sold their homes to us for triple the amount of what they are worth.

Four business owners who opened up after Rookwood did that wanted to parasite off of us and one landlord who does not live in the house that is a shit hole, (I am looking at it right now) did not want to sell.

We have "forced" nobody to be homeless.

Say what you want, re-development needs to happen. In this area where there are going to be major traffic concerns, and over crowding, eminent domain is going to happen just to accomodate the cars.

Now here is a solution that not only relieves the traffic issues, but brings new businesses, homes and stores to the neighborhood.

Just today, Sheakley Group, an outsourcer of human resource survices, announced they are moving their headquarters to this project. This is going to bring 500 jobs to Norwood and a combined payroll of $19 million.

We are doing a re-construction of an abandoned mall in Northern Kentucky, the Crestview Mall. It has been sitting empty for twenty years, with just a Dillards open in there.

As soon as we announce the project, a senior citizen group gets all up in arms because, now they are not going to have anywhere to mall walk. Who cares that this giant, economic blight and eyesore has just been draining income out of the community?

Like it or not, this is a capitalist society, we need economic progress.

If someone came to me and offered me three times the worth of my house tomorrow for the property, I would do it, hands down.

_________________
Pickles are destroying my life.

confuseddildo.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 3:04 pm 
Friendship Farmer of the Year 2006
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2003 9:05 am
Posts: 7620
Location: The Cookie Capital of the World
annie oakley wrote:
If someone came to me and offered me three times the worth of my house tomorrow for the property, I would do it, hands down.


Uh huh. And what if you were just renting the house? (As in the original post.)

_________________
It was fifteen years ago, but I remember it like it was ten.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2004 3:12 pm 
Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 17, 2003 1:02 pm
Posts: 2897
Location: The After Dark Peach Pit
The Lantern wrote:
Columbus real estate developer, Richard J. Solove, showed his support of the Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Research Institute by donating $20 million to the hospital in January 1999.



I also learned that the Timken site was acquired by Solove's non-profit agency he created. Weird.... here's a Business First article from September: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/sto ... tory1.html


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 97 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron


Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group






Buy a Premium BlogAd